84 Statistics That Prove That The Decline Of The Middle Class Is Real And That It Is Getting Worse

The middle class in America is being systematically destroyed. Once upon a time the United States had the largest and most vibrant middle class in the history of the world. The rest of the globe looked at us in envy and wondered what we were doing right. But now everything seems to be going wrong for the middle class. Millions of our jobs have been shipped out of the country and competition for the remaining jobs is keeping wages at depressed levels. Meanwhile, the cost of living just keeps going up and up and middle class budgets are being stretched and strained like never before. Millions more Americans fall out of the middle class and into poverty every single year, and government dependence is at an all-time high. Finding a solution to the decline of the middle class is absolutely central to fixing the economic problems in this country. Without a large, thriving middle class this would not be America. The truth is that people from all over the world want to come here because they want to work hard, buy a house, raise a family and provide a better future for their children. This has traditionally been “the land of opportunity”, but now the middle class is rapidly declining and none of our politicians seem to have any solutions. With each passing day, the American Dream is slipping through the fingers of millions of hard working American families. We owe it to them to get this thing fixed. The following are 84 statistics that prove that the decline of the middle class is real and that it is getting worse…. 1. According to the Pew Research Center, 61 percent of all Americans were “middle income” back in 1971. Today, only 51 percent of all Americans are. 2. The Pew Research Center has also found that 85 percent of middle class Americans say that it is harder to maintain a middle class standard of living today compared with 10 years ago. 3. 62 percent of middle class Americans say that they have had to reduce household spending over the past year. 4. The average net worth of a middle class family in America was $129,582 in 2001. By 2010 that figure had dropped to $93,150 . 5. According to the Federal Reserve, the median net worth of all families in the United States declined ” from $126,400 in 2007 to $77,300 in 2010 “. 6. Back in 1970, middle income Americans brought home 62 percent of all income in the United States. In 2010, middle income Americans only brought home 45 percent of all income. 7. After you adjust for inflation, median family income in the United States has fallen by about 6 percent since the year 2000. 8. Real median household income has decreased by more than 4000 dollars since Barack Obama entered the White House. 9. Amazingly, more than half of all Americans are now at least partially financially dependent on the government. 10. In 1970, 65 percent of all Americans lived in “middle class neighborhoods”. By 2007, only 44 percent of all Americans lived in “middle class neighborhoods”. 11. If you can believe it, one recent survey found that 28 percent of all Americans do not have a single penny saved for emergencies. 12. The United States was once ranked #1 in the world in GDP per capita. Today we have slipped to #12 . 13. The total value of household real estate in the U.S. has declined from $22.7 trillion in 2006 to $16.2 trillion today. Most of that wealth has been lost by the middle class. 14. Back in 2007, 19.2 percent of all American families had a net worth of zero or less. By 2010, that figure had risen to 32.5 percent . 15. Since the year 2000, incomes for U.S. households led by someone between the ages of 25 and 34 have fallen by about 12 percent after you adjust for inflation. 16. In 1984, the median net worth of households led by someone 65 or older was 10 times larger than the median net worth of households led by someone 35 or younger. Today, the median net worth of households led by someone 65 or older is 47 times larger than the median net worth of households led by someone 35 or younger. 17. Corporate profits as a percentage of GDP are at an all-time high . Meanwhile, wages as a percentage of GDP are near an all-time low . 18. There are now 20.2 million Americans that spend more than half of their incomes on housing. That represents a 46 percent increase from 2001. 19. The average American household spent approximately $4,155 on gasoline during 2011, and electricity bills in the U.S. have risen faster than the overall rate of inflation for five years in a row . 20. Over the past decade, health insurance premiums have risen three times faster than wages have in the United States. 21. Health insurance costs have risen by 23 percent since Barack Obama became president. According

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